My supervisor is intimidating

The key to doing this is to understand the dynamics of intimidation and the motivation of those who attempt to wield it.

And the problem is that fear stimulated by workplace intimidation robs its victim employees of their ability to perform at peak levels.

For this reason, intimidation used as a tool of management is counterproductive and destructive.

For example, when a pack of street thugs hold you at gun point in a dark alley.

Intimidation, on the other hand, is a tactic used by a weak management to create an artificial aura of fear that something bad might happen.

He will keep pushing so long as he thinks he can get away with such action.

On the other hand, as soon as the intimidator realizes you will not be intimidated, then the whole relationship will change.

Like a Stephen King horror story, intimidation comes at us in many forms and faces.

As long as intimidation is going to be part of our lives, we might as well learn how to deal with it, resist it, and even use it.

The use of power, authority, position and status to intimidate workers into compliance is, at many companies, considered to be one of the most effective of management’s bag of coercive tools.

Respect for authority, position and status is fine, but using them to intimidate others into submissive acquiescence is quite another thing.

From that experience, one observation clearly stands out: Those who consistently use their position or power in an organization to intimidate others do so in response to their own inner anxieties of insecurity, weakness and fear of being exposed as incompetent.

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